International Coffee

  • Turkish Coffee
    With some basic equipment and a little know-how, it’s a cinch to make this great-tasting cup of coffee (which is known in Turkish as Türk …

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  • Spanish Coffee
    If you were to visit a coffee house in Spain, you would likely find the selection of coffees to be astounding. While every region has …

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  • Mexican Coffee
    Mexico produces over five million bags of coffee a year, yet exports less than half of its harvest. To say that coffee is a popular …

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  • Costa Rica Coffee
    Costa Rica Coffee – Slightly acidic, enriched with volcanic ash, and teeming with organic matter, Costa Rican soil is ideal for growing coffee. Paired with …

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  • Jamaican Coffee
    For most people, Jamaica conjures images of beaches and vacation resorts. But for coffee enthusiasts, the country represents the finest, most sought after coffee beans …

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  • Italian Coffee
    In Italy, there are almost as many types of coffee as there are pastas, and gourmet Italian coffee is no exception. Typically brewed in either …

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  • Irish Coffee
    Created by Irish chef Joseph Sheridan, Irish coffee(Caife Gaelach) was traditionally given to travelers as a warm-up drink in the early twentieth century. It’s believed …

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  • Greek Coffee
    Also known as Turkish coffee, Greek coffee (Ellinikos kafes) is made by boiling finely ground coffee beans. Like Turkish coffee, it is unfiltered, and one …

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  • International Coffee
    The climate, soil, and altitude of coffee-growing regions impact the coffee bean, resulting in a distinctive aroma, acidity, flavor, and body. Today, consumers can enjoy …

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International Coffee

The climate, soil, and altitude of coffee-growing regions impact the coffee bean, resulting in a distinctive aroma, acidity, flavor, and body. Today, consumers can enjoy coffee harvested globally from each growing region. Here’s a brief overview of some of the distinctive international coffee flavors and characteristics:

Latin American Coffees: Coffees harvested from Mexico, Central and South America, Columbia, Panama, the Caribbean, and Costa Rica are characterized by a medium to high acidity and a tangy, sweet flavor. These blends are commonly used for breakfast coffees.

Arabian and African Coffees: Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, and Kilimanjaro produce spicy-flavored coffees with hints of cocoa, citrus, and berries. Distinguished by a thick, syrup-like body and dark roast, African and Arabian coffees are often served as a dessert accompaniment.

Asia and Indo Pacific Coffees: Grown in Asia, Indonesia, and the Pacific Islands, these coffees have low acidity and a bold, heavy body. Characterized by a robust, earthy, or slightly bitter flavor, coffees grown in this region complement rich desserts and dark chocolates. Common coffees from this region include Monsoon Malabar, Sumatra, and Yemeni.

Exotic Coffees: Harvested from Hawaii and Jamaica, exotic coffees are prized for their rich aroma and full flavor. Kona and Jamaican Blue Mountain are popular varieties from this region.

While serious coffee connoisseurs can identify the origins of their coffee beans solely by aroma, those who are new to coffees from abroad may not have honed this talent. Sample bags of gourmet beans are a fun way to experiment with different regions, blends, and flavors. The next time you brew a pot, think globally and try an international coffee instead of your current blend. You may be pleasantly surprised to discover what you’ve been missing.

Spanish Coffee

Irish Coffee

Italian Coffee

Greek Coffee

Turkish Coffee

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